How Many Affiliate Launches Can You Promote in a Year?

How to Find the Right Number for Your Audience

One of the most common questions I get from readers is, “How many affiliate launches can I promote each year?” That is a bit of a loaded question that normally gets a response with even more questions. Here’s how to decide how many promotions are right for you.

affiliate launches

First, you have to acknowledge that there is no “one-size-fits-all” answer. For some people, the answer may be as few as two per year, while others have tons of success promoting as many as 15 per year.

Here’s what we advise our private coaching clients to do to find the right number for them. Ask yourself these three questions:

1. How Does Your Audience Respond to Affiliate Promotions?

I am not suggesting to cater to the whims of a handful of outspoken people who hate it when you promote someone else.

What do the numbers tell you, both financially and in terms of audience reaction (unsubscribes)?

2. How Much Will You Support Each Launch?

If you plan on giving a high-level of support to each launch, you will naturally promote fewer launches.

If you plan on giving each launch a single email, you can do a lot more.

3. Do You “Owe” Anyone a Reciprocal?

If someone has promoted you in the past and you owe them (implied or explicitly stated), you have to promote.

If you owe 5 people this year, that sets your minimum at 5 of course.

Most people will answer these questions and fall somewhere in the spectrum of doing 4-10 affiliate launches per year.

How to Narrow Down Possible Affiliate Opportunities

Once you have a good idea of how many you want to promote in a given year, follow these 5 steps:

1. Start With Your Own Launches and Promotions

The first dates that should go on your calendar each year are your own launches and promotions.

Get those set in stone before you commit to anything else.

2. Build a One Week Buffer

Once you have your dates on the calendar, add at least one week before and after.

Those dates are off limits as well, as you’ll want to give your audience a rest before and after your main events.

3. Make a List of Everything You Could Support

This step is simple. Make a list of everything you could possibly support as an affiliate. If you are looking for a good list to start with, check out our upcoming affiliate launches page.

4. Decide What Fits

Now it’s time to decide what fits.

Start with the easiest qualifier first: the dates. If the dates don’t work, you can’t promote it. These are easy to eliminate.

Next, use this free scorecard to decide if the product or service is a good fit for your audience and if you will succeed at promoting it.

If any of the launches overlap, you have to decide what you want to do about that. You could:

  • Choose one over the other
  • Segment your list and promote both
  • Promote both at first and segment from there
  • Promote one via email and the other via paid ads

Steps three and four should narrow things down considerably.

5. Narrow Down to Your Desired Number

At this point, you have to make tough choices.

The remaining launches are all good fits for your audience and calendar, but you don’t want to constantly be in promotion mode, so you eliminate some to give your audience some space.

This part is generally very subjective. I will often take a look at the scores from my “Should I Promote This?” scorecard and drop the lowest scores. Other times, it’s a matter of the calendar. If I decide to promote two launches back-to-back, the third one loses out. Sometimes, it’s a matter of wanting to help someone in particular with their launch or other factors.

My Magic Number

For me, my magic number of affiliate promotions is about 8 per year. Here’s how that looks for me:

4 internal launches effectively knocks out 4 months of the year (17 days on average for a launch plus a week on either side).

Typically we’ll see about 20 offers we want to promote. We start by looking at the dates. That usually knocks out about 5.

Next, we score them on our 1-30 scale. That gets us down to about 10.

Lastly, we have to eliminate two, which is tough. Like I mentioned before, this part is a lot less science and more of a coin flip.

Once we have our eight, they are mostly set in stone. We’ll occasionally add one (as we just did a few weeks ago for one in August), but otherwise, we stick to the calendar.

Follow my formula and you’ll know your magic number, too.

Question: What is your magic number of affiliate launches per year? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Free Affiliate Training from Matt McWilliams
  • Matt – great post on an important topic. I struggle with this because I have so many great friends in this online community. I want to encourage and support them. Many of them have been to my events and then start doing what I teach so I feel some obligation to help promote them. But I also want to serve my audience well and not suggest to them that success requires all the latest courses and events.

    With the sophistication of email marketing (allowing us to personalize every message) people often ask me why I suggested a particular course to them when obviously they just got the mass email. So I do struggle with a healthy balance on this.

    Thanks for your post.

    • Hey Dan,

      Sorry I missed your comment earlier.

      I know that for me, this is where segmentation has really helped. I’m able to promote more great products to the right people.

      I see this benefitting all three sides: the product owner, me, and the audience.

      The product owner benefits because I would say no to promoting them if not for segmentation. But now I get to say yes. Rather than make 0 sales, I make 5, 10, 20 or more for them.

      I benefit because I get to say yes to more people who will in turn promote me to their audiences (or a client) and because I make more money.

      The audience wins because rather than get 8 generic offers that go to everyone, they get 8 that are a good fit for them. That probably requires me to promote 12-14 total.

      • Cloris Kylie

        You bring up such an important point, Matt. It’s about promoting products that are the right fit, and segmentation is the answer. Thank you!

  • Pingback: Busted Myth: Entrepreneurship is Risky()