The 8 Things Your Team Really Wants, Pt. 2 [PODCAST]

Team members at work want the same things we all want in every aspect of life.

I want to be trusted. I want my boss to believe in me and trust my judgment.

Replace the word “boss” with “spouse” or “parents” and the sentence above is still true. The leader-team member relationship is no different from any other relationship.

world-changer-show-episode-013 I want to control my own destiny. I want to have a voice in my career. (Tweet That) | Share this Graphic on Pinterest | Share on Facebook

Replace the word “career” with “marriage” or “education” and the sentence is still true. We all want a sense of control and we all want a voice.

We’re continuing the series on the 8 Things Your Team REALLY Wants with part two today, #5 through #8. If you missed part one in Episode 11, you can listen to it here.

What Every Great Leader Eventually Learns

I don’t consider myself a great leader. Yet.

But I’ve learned the one thing every great leader eventually learns. In fact, I am finally putting it into practice.

Great leaders delegate It takes a team to change the world. It takes a leader who will give up control and delegate. (Tweet That) | Share this Graphic on Pinterest | Share on Facebook

I finally reached the point earlier this year when my first thought on a new to-do item is “who can I assign this to?” That is the one thing that all great leaders learn to do.

Doing it all myself

I’m 35 years old as of this writing. I’ve been business owner or leader of some sort for ten years almost to the day. For the majority of that time, I did everything myself. I didn’t delegate except as a last resort.

I hired my first assistant in 2007 but it never occurred to me to delegate anything of importance to her. The same was true for my next assistant. Thankfully, he was ambitious and looked for opportunities to shine without waiting for me to delegate to him. Naturally, he was promoted.

Remembering Nelson Mandela and his Six Life Lessons

The world truly lost a legend yesterday.

Nelson Mandela was a champion of principle. He fought for what he believed in and left a legacy for the entire world.

Life lessons from Nelson Mandela

Last night, as the news broke of Nelson Mandela’s death, I tweeted:

How is it that a man in his position could rise to worldwide prominence? How is it that hundreds of years from now, people will use the words “modern-day Nelson Mandela” to describe another man or woman? And how can we leave a legacy like he has?

Odds are that none of us will ever go through what Mandela went through in his life. He spent 27 years in prison, often in conditions so dreary and dark that it led to him developing a case of tuberculosis shortly before his release in 1990. And yet we can all learn six powerful traits from him.

Customer Service Begins with the Leader | You Must Trust Your Team

The book LaserMonks says it best:

Going overboard with customer service only results in an excellent experience for the customer. There is never a downside.

Over time, there is no downside. And yet too many leaders and customer service managers get caught up in the minutiae. They quickly forget about all the great customer service experiences customers have and report to their friends, but they easily remember the one time that one weird guy took advantage of their generosity.

So they create more “rules” and “processes” for their team. In doing so, they stifle their creative and generous spirit. In the long run, they pay for it. They kill the spirit of their customer service reps who end up being nothing more than order takers.

Have you ever seen that happen?

Customer Service Leader

I have seen that happen. In fact, I’ve done it to my team. I’ve buried them under a heap of rules, processes, and bureaucratic hoops to jump through. This was long before I learned that customer service rules were meant to be broken, as I shared recently.

Attention Leaders: Your Team is Begging to be Trusted & Have Control

Team members at work want the same things we all want in every aspect of life.

What your team wants - control and trust

I want to be trusted. I want my boss to believe in me and trust my judgment.

Replace the word “boss” with “spouse” or “parents” and the sentence above is still true. The leader-team member relationship is no different from any other relationship.

I want to control my own destiny. I want to have a voice in my career.

Replace the word “career” with “marriage” or “education” and the sentence is still true. We all want a sense of control and we all want a voice.

We’re continuing this series on the 8 Things Your Team REALLY Wants with part three today:

To be trusted and to control their own destiny.

And we’ll continue to use Simon’s company as an example. If you missed parts one and two, the links are below. Make sure to subscribe to my RSS feed or get posts via email (and get my free book as a bonus) so you don’t miss the last installment coming up.

Part One: Fair Pay and the Right Resources

Part Two: Creating a Clear Vision and Setting Realistic Expectations

Our Amazing Capacity to Trust | Choose to Trust

We are born with an amazing capacity to trust.

We literally come out of the womb with an innate ability and need to trust others. We trust our parents to care for us, warm us up when we are cold, and feed us when we are hungry, and provide our basic needs.

No one taught us how to trust. There isn’t a workshop that babies attend or a book they read. I believe that it really is a core part of our DNA.

Ability to trust is in our DNA
When trust is broken

But somewhere along the way, trust is broken.

A parent leaves.

A business partner burns you.

A spouse seeks love in another’s arms.

Your first employee is a flake who doesn’t live up to his hype.

A friend betrays you.

And often we utter words like, “I’ll never trust again.” Or, “I’ve lost the ability to trust anymore.”

I sympathize with those who say those words, but they are simply not sure.