When All You Have Left is Your Dream…

There is beauty in simplicity…

Have you ever been in a position when all you had left was your dream? What was the result?

What has led you to stop making excuses?

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  • I guess when this happens, you can either wallow in despair or reach for the skies and go after your dream. For me, I think I stopped dreaming for a while when life ran over me. Over the past year, I have seen my dreaming skills returning and improving.

  • Lulu

    Matt – sorry, I don’t get it. It reads profound, but it must be over my head. Can you elaborate a bit for me? Thanks.

    • Think about a time in life where you had a dream, but also you had 17 other things in your life that acted as excuses (“day job,” naysayers, fear, lack of education, you name it).

      Once you lose those things, all you have left is your dream. When that is all you have left, the excuses are gone.

      • Lulu

        I guess I am too practical. I don’t think any dream can be reached without supports in place. Example: I always dreamed of being a vet. It was a pleasant dream, appealed to the animal love and medical interest. But it is a dream. If I have no money, not enough smarts in science (although a love or it), no support – it isn’t going to happen. Let’s say someone gave me a million dollars – that “excuse” is gone – but nothing is going to change my abilities. No…I don’t think excuses get in the way – but reasons do. What did Disney say? A dream is a wish your heart makes. I may wish to see properly again, I may wish I could still drive, I may wish that I hadn’t lost all my savings – and I can dream of a better life – but unless there is divine intervention – it isn’t going to happen. That is where trust comes in. I have to trust that I am where I am at the moment because God wants me here. I think it is fun and inspirational to dream – but if that is all you have – I tremble. Sorry Matt. May all your dreams come true.

  • I like it – take everything else away and then you can’t use those “things” as an excuse to not go for it. If I am afraid of losing my house, my car, my security then it is harder to make big changes that rock the boat. Our problem is not that we are insecure, it is that we are too secure.

    • I like this: Our problem is not that we are insecure, it is that we are too secure.

      That is actually very true. It surprised me to learn that security is actually what keeps many (not all) people in this country in poverty. While they say they are insecure about paying bills, they are more insecure about being financially independent. It scares them to even think for a moment that they could be better off than their parents, pay 30+% in taxes, or be able to retire at 60.

      I have a few people like that in my life and sometimes I am at a loss as to how to help them.