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Do you remember when you were a child and you played “make believe?”

You were a spy, a doctor, an astronaut, or perhaps an athlete. You took on the persona of whoever you were pretending to be. You talked like a spy would, you thought like a doctor, you did the things that kind of person would do.

In other words, you acted “as if.”

Childlike imagination leads to great success
The key to a life of purpose, influence, excellence, and abundance starts in your imagination. (Tweet That) | Share this Graphic on Pinterest | Share on Facebook

The dictionary defines “make believe” as:

pretending that what is not real is real

Kids have the most amazing imaginations. I am experiencing this with our daughter now. Aracelli is 3 1/2 years old and she was talking to my mother this week. She told my mom all sorts of amazing tales of adventure, of dogs flying airplanes, chasing the deer through the woods, and doing all sorts of wild and exciting things.

What an imagination!

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My kindergarten teacher ruined me as a leader for nearly twenty-five years.

It’s not her fault. She meant well when she told me that day that if I brought cookies to class, I must bring enough for everyone. I’d only brought a few extra for my friends.

She meant well when she essentially said, “what you do for one, you must do for all.” But that is terrible leadership advice.

Kindergarten Leadership
“What you do for one, you must do for all” might work in kindergarten, but it’s terrible leadership advice. (Tweet That) | Share this Graphic on Pinterest | Share on Facebook

At an early age I learned that if I could not do for all, then I should do for none.

Why should only a few friends get to enjoy a cookie along with me when the others must suffer in salivating agony? The problem was that I could not afford, at the age of five, to buy cookies for twenty kids. I barely had enough to buy the few that I bought.

So, no one got to enjoy the extra cookies (except me). Not my friends. Not the others in class. No one.

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I hate SMART goals.

Don’t get me wrong, they are well-intentioned and I believe there is a place for them, but we’ve taken them too far. When we rely on SMART goals, we forget to think big, to shoot for the moon, to dream.

Why I hate SMART Goals
When we rely on SMART goals, we forget to think big, to shoot for the moon, to dream. (Tweet That) | Share this Graphic on Pinterest | Share on Facebook

Yesterday I asked: Do you want to live a life of adventure? I asked what a life of adventure would look like for you. I asked you to think ahead to the moment we all reach when you’re looking back on the life you’ve lived. Do you want to say as Tom Preston-Werner, the founder of Github, says:

‘Wow, that was an adventure,’ not ‘Wow, I sure felt safe.’

I do. And that is why I think SMART goals have gone too far.

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Adventure is a dangerous word.

To some, adventure implies that you must be wielding a sword, hiking Mount Everest, or risking death at every turn. But what if life could be an adventure? What if you could get past playing it safe and live a life of adventure?

What would that look like for you? When you are old and dying, what would a life well-lived, an adventurous life, look like for you?

Life of Adventure
When you are old and dying, what would a life well-lived, an adventurous life, look like for you? (Tweet That) | Share this Graphic on Pinterest | Share on Facebook

Goals

My wife, Tara, and I set our family goals this past week.

Some were short-term. Some were long-term. Most were safe. Most were goals that if we achieved them, we’d be thrilled. If we missed, oh well. For the most part, they were relatively mundane, like so many goals that we all set.

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