Episode 065: How to Overcome Negative Self-Talk

6 Strategies to Overcome the Negative Words You Say About Yourself

Do yourself a favor…the next time you start to say something bad about yourself, SHUT UP! Seriously, shut up. Don’t say it.

How to Overcome Negative Self-Talk

You can think it, but don’t say it. Don’t mumble it under your breathe. Don’t say it to someone else. Don’t write it down.

Your negative thoughts don’t have to become reality. In fact they can’t be, because you are too valuable to the rest of us to live that way.

So shut up.

You’d Never Make it as a… | Career Purpose from Matt McWilliams

Listen to this post

Have you ever been told that you’d never make it as a ____?

I have.

Purpose in work
At first I thought it meant something was wrong with me. That I was deficient in some way. I felt inadequate every time I was told that.

Until I realized they were right. They were absolutely right…and I was OK with that!

I would never make it as a…

There are literally tens of thousands of things at which I am terrible. Tens of thousands of careers in which I would never make it.

If You Can’t Say Something Nice | Overcome Negative Self-Talk

Listen to this post

Do yourself a favor…the next time you start to say something bad about yourself,

SHUT UP!

Seriously, shut up. Don’t say it.

Shut up negative self-talk

You can think it, but don’t say it. Don’t mumble it under your breathe. Don’t say it to someone else. Don’t write it down.

Your negative thoughts don’t have to become reality. In fact they can’t be, because you are too valuable to the rest of us to live that way.

So shut up.

The Most Persuasive Word for Leaders

The most powerful words are always the simplest.

For instance, the most powerful word in leadership is “believe.” That is a word we all know, yet we rarely use it with our team. You can read more about that powerful word here.

The Most Powerful Word to be a Persuasive Leader

In his best-selling book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion (I have read it three times now and highly recommend it), social psychologist Robert Cialdini tells us about the power of this word. In it, he shares a study by Harvard social psychologist Ellen Langer that shows the almost irrational effect the word “because” has on the hearer:

A well-known principle of human behavior says that when we ask someone to do us a favor we will be more successful if we provide a reason. People simply like to have reasons for what they do. Langer demonstrated this unsurprising fact by asking a small favor of people waiting in line to use a library copying machine: Excuse me, I have five pages. May I use the Xerox machine because I’m in a rush? The effectiveness of this request-plus-reason was nearly total: Ninety-four percent of those asked let her skip ahead of them in line.

Compare this success rate to the results when she made the request only: Excuse me, I have five pages. May I use the Xerox machine? Under those circumstances, only 60 percent of those asked complied. At first glance, it appears that the crucial difference between the two requests was the additional information provided by the words, “because I’m in a rush.”